Buying a new generator is not something you should do when an emergency hits. Instead, do a little research and buy one that’s appropriate for your family's needs.

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In many parts of the state, heavy spring rains following a snowier- than-normal winter have caused headaches for folks with basements. Keep these safety tips in mind if you experience anything from a slightly wet floor to several inches of water (or more) in your basement.

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Downed power lines can carry an electric current strong enough to cause serious injury or possibly death.

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What should you do if you’re caught outside during a storm? 

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A downed power line can carry an electric current strong enough to cause serious injury or even death. In many cases, you won’t be able to tell whether the line is energized or not – especially if it’s covered by snow or under water during a thaw. Keep these things in mind when using a portable generator.

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During a power outage, you can connect a heavy-duty extension cord to a portable generator and run it to a few essential lights and perhaps a small appliance or two – or fire up a much larger generator to run several lights, a refrigerator and even a space heater. However, it may be more convenient – and safer – to connect the generator directly to your home’s electrical service panel through a professionally installed, permanent transfer switch that isolates individual circuits in your home from the co-op’s power lines. 

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